Below are links to the national resources and helpful information regarding the COVID-19 vaccination programme. 

This section and the frequently asked questions (FAQs) below will hopefully provide some answers to questions you may have around the vaccination of 5 to 11 year olds. The vaccine was made available following updated guidance from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) that recommends children in this age group receive the vaccine. 

The NHS wants to support families to make an informed choice and parents/guardians must give consent for their child to be vaccinated.

Children aged 5 to 11 years old with no underlying health conditions will be offered two paediatric (child) doses of the vaccine, with at least 12 weeks between doses. This dose is smaller than doses given to those aged 12 years plus.

Children aged 5 to 11 years who are more at risk of the virus will be offered two paediatric (child) doses, eight weeks apart, and this will be arranged through their GP practice or hospital specialist.

If your child has had COVID they will need to wait 12 weeks before getting vaccinated, so please don’t book an appointment for them until this time has passed.

 

Frequently asked questions

  • Is COVID-19 serious in young children?
    For most children COVID-19 is a mild illness that may require a few days off school but rarely leads to complications. For a very few children, the symptoms can be more serious or last longer. Children with certain health conditions, or those with a weakened immune system, are at higher risk of serious COVID-19 disease.

     
  • My child is healthy. What are the benefits of them having the COVID-19 vaccine?
    As well as protecting children and young people against serious COVID infection, by getting vaccinated, children and young people can reduce the risk of passing on the infection to others in their family and those they come into contact with. Getting the vaccine can also make it easier for children and young people to avoid putting their lives and their education on hold because of further disruption to schools, hobbies, and social events due to the virus.

     
  • My child has already had COVID-19 and has built up natural immunity. Why do they still need the vaccine?
    The COVID-19 vaccine should give your child stronger protection than natural immunity from previous infection against serious complications of infection including any future waves due to new variants. Your child should also have some protection from the mild symptoms, and vaccination lowers the risk they will pass the virus on to others around them.

     
  • Is there more risk to a child having COVID-19 or the vaccine?
    The risk to a child of serious impact from COVID-19 is relatively low, but it will be lower if they get the vaccine. Research shows the COVID-19 vaccine can prevent the virus’s worst effects, can reduce the risk of hospitalisation, and it can protect your child and those around them from catching the virus as easily. Most children and young people experience only mild symptoms following COVID-19 infection or are asymptomatic.


    However, there is evidence that some will experience long-COVID (symptoms include extreme tiredness, shortness of breath and difficulty sleeping), and a minority of children may develop a delayed response known as Paediatric Inflammatory Multisystem Syndrome (PIMS-TS or PIMS) following COVID-19 infection. The vaccine has been tested across the world and found to be safe and effective, including for children this age.
     
  • Why is the NHS offering vaccinations to 5 to 11-year-olds when the Government/JCVI has said it is not urgent?
    JCVI has recommended that the NHS offer vaccinations to all 5 to 11 year olds, to boost immunity and increase their protection against any future waves of COVID-19. This recommendation has been accepted by Government and the vaccine has been approved for this age group by the UK’s medicines regulator. COVID-19 is still active and causing some children to miss out on their education and the things they enjoy. The NHS wants to support families to make an informed choice, and to make things convenient and child-friendly for those who do decide to get it.

     
  • Will the vaccine give my child COVID-19?
    Your child cannot catch COVID-19 from the vaccine. There is sometimes a delay in vaccines symptoms so it is possible they could catch the virus but not realise this until after their vaccination.

     
  • How long will the vaccine protect my child from COVID-19?
    The COVID-19 vaccination will reduce the chance of your child suffering from COVID-19 disease. It may take a few weeks for their body to build up maximum protection from the vaccine. Two doses of the vaccine should give your child long lasting protection against serious complications of infection –including any future waves due to new variants. Some children may still get COVID-19 despite being vaccinated, but this should be less severe. 
    If a child has had COVID-19 they will still get extra protection from the vaccine, but they will need to wait 12 weeks before getting vaccinated.
     
  • Which vaccine will my child be given and how many doses will they need?
    Children aged 5 to 11 with no other underlying health conditions will be offered two paediatric (child) doses of the vaccine, with at least 12 weeks between doses. A paediatric dose is smaller than the doses given to those aged 12 and over.

     
  • Why is there a difference in the dose for 5 to 11-year-olds and those over 12?
    5 to 11 year olds will be given a paediatric dose, 10 micrograms of Pfizer vaccine, compared to the 30 micrograms of Pfizer vaccine given to older children and adults. The majority of children and young people experience only mild symptoms following COVID-19 infection or are asymptomatic. A smaller dose will provide protection while also reducing the risk of side-effects.

     
  • Is the paediatric dose as effective as the adult dose?
    The immune response in 5 to 11 year olds after a paediatric dose of the vaccine will protect them from severe disease and reduce the risk of side-effects, in the same way that the adult dose protects those aged 12 and over. The vaccine does not remove the virus, but research and experience of countries around the world shows it can prevent the worst effects of COVID-19 and reduce the risk of infection to your child and those around them.

     
  • My child is vulnerable/at risk. When should they have their vaccine?
    Children aged 5 to 11 years-old, who are more at risk from the virus can get two paediatric (child) doses, eight weeks apart, and their GP or hospital specialist should be in touch to arrange this.

     
  • Where can I get my child the COVID-19 vaccine?
    Vaccination centres, pharmacies and GPs in England are offering the COVID-19 vaccine to help protect 5 to 11 year olds. Invitation letters have been sent out and appointments can be booked easily, just visit www.nhs.uk/covid-vaccination or call 119 to book your first or second dose. 
    There are also convenient vaccine walk-ins across the country, which you can find on www.nhs.uk/grab-a-jab.
     
  • I want to get my child vaccinated, what is the consent process?
    Parents, carers or those with parental responsibilities should attend COVID-19 vaccination appointments with their child. Unlike vaccinations in schools, consent is collected on the day so this is the best way to make sure they can be vaccinated by going through questions together on site. For looked after children, please refer to the care plan where permissions and restrictions of consent will be outlined.

     
  • My child is scared of injections, is it better to visit a vaccination site or GP/Pharmacy?
    All vaccination sites, including GPs and Pharmacies are making efforts to ensure the vaccination environment is child-friendly and welcoming for families with young children. Vaccinators will make reasonable adjustments and fast-track individuals who are worried about vaccination. For example, sites may offer longer appointments and minimise the waiting time for children who are feeling anxious.

     
  • Will my child be offered a booster?
    The NHS follows government decisions about who to vaccinate and the number of doses they received, which reflect recommendations of the Joint Committee on Vaccinations and Immunisations (JCVI). Currently there are no plans to offer healthy 5 to 11 year olds a booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

     
  • Where can I get more information on getting vaccinated?
    The Hampshire and Isle of Wight COVID-19 Vaccination Helpline can help you with finding your nearest clinics, getting information in other languages such as Polish, Arabic, Chinese, Bengali and more, as well as sharing the latest information on eligibility. 

    You can contact the helpline on 0300 561 0018 from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday, and 9am to 1pm at weekends. 

 

Further information relating to COVID vaccination for children aged 5 to 11 years old can be found here, this includes links to the information in a range of different languages and what to expect after your child is vaccinated.

Easy read guidance for parents or carers for this group can be found here.

Everyone aged 12 to 15 is eligible for two doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. Children can get a first dose of the vaccine from the day they turn 12.

Appointments for first or second vaccinations can be made via the National Booking Service online or by calling 119 between 8am to 8pm, seven days a week. You can also attend any eligible walk-in clinic. You can also call the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Helpline on 0300 561 0018 for more information on vaccinations and help finding your nearest site. 

Please note that children under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian who can provide consent.

Any 12 to 15 year old who has tested positive for COVID-19 and is not at high risk from COVID-19 must wait 12 weeks before they can have a COVID-19 vaccine. This starts from the date of their positive PCR test.

Below is some key information around the vaccination of people aged 12 to 15 years, which may be useful.

COVID-19 is a very infectious respiratory disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Very few healthy children and young people with COVID-19 infection go on to have severe disease.

Vaccinating children should help to reduce the need for children to have time off school and to reduce the risk of spread of COVID-19 within schools. 

  • How can 12 to 15-year-olds get their vaccination?
    Appointments for first or second vaccinations (if 12 weeks have passed) for 12 to 15 year olds can be made via the National Booking Service online or by calling 119 between 8am and 8pm, seven days a week. The three mass vaccination centres across Hampshire and the Isle of Wight are also now offering walk-in appointments to people aged 12-15 for their first or second COVID-19 vaccinations. Community based pop-ups are also available. You can also call the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Helpline on 0300 561 0018 for more information on vaccinations and help finding your nearest site. School-age immunisation service providers have also visited most schools across Hampshire and the Isle of Wight to offer vaccinations to this age group.
     
  • When will the school immunisation service start up again?
    Most schools will require multiple visits so that vaccines can be given to all consenting pupils and all schools will have had at least one visit by now. In line with national guidance, consent letters are sent out to parents and guardians before the school clinics are held with information on the COVID-19 vaccination.
     
  • Can parents/guardians attend vaccinations at school?
    Parents and guardians are asked to attend vaccination sites with their children if are getting jabbed outside of school hours and consent will be sought on the day. Parents of children with special educational needs and not in mainstream schools are welcome to attend clinics with their children if this will help the child feel more at ease.
     
  • Will consent be sought from parents/the person with parental responsibility?
    As with all vaccinations, for those aged 12 to 15 years consent will be sought by the School Age Immunisation Service (SAIS) provider from the parent or person with parental responsibility in the same way as for any other school vaccination programme. A consent form and information leaflet provided by the SAIS team will be used to seek parental consent. Parents will also be provided with a contact number for the SAIS team in case of any queries. Forms should be returned by the deadline agreed with the team. Any child aged 12 to 15 attending a vaccination site, pop-up, community pharmacy or GP site will need to attend with their parent or guardian, who will be asked to give their consent. 
     
  • Can parents refuse to give consent for their child to be vaccinated?
    Yes. The vaccination is not mandatory. Parents will be asked to give their consent for the vaccination. Children may express a wish to have the vaccine and may have the capacity to provide informed consent themselves. Parents are encouraged to speak to their children ahead of time so that there is agreement on consent. This is a well-established process which is used in other school-based vaccination programmes.
     
  • What happens if a parent has not consented, but the child wants to be vaccinated?
    Young people who understand fully what is involved in a proposed procedure, such as vaccination, can legally give consent. This is known as ‘Gillick competence’. If no consent from a parent has been received, but the child wants to be vaccinated and is judged to be Gillick competent by the healthcare professional, the child can still be vaccinated. In this case, the healthcare professional will make every effort to contact a parent to check before they proceed.

    If a parent objects to their child being vaccinated but the child wants to be vaccinated and is judged to be Gillick competent, the healthcare professional will try to reach agreement between the parent and child. However, the parent cannot overrule the decision of a Gillick competent child. Trained professionals in the SAIS team, with expertise in vaccinating children will speak to the child. The SAIS team will assess the individual child’s capacity to self-consent (Gillick competence) and be responsible for deciding the appropriateness of administering the vaccine.
     
  • How are schools involved in the consent process?
    Whilst schools may host immunisation services, they are not responsible for securing parental or child consent, for assessing Gillick competence or mediating between parents and children who may disagree about whether or not to consent. This is the role of registered nurses in the SAIS, who have extensive experience and the expertise to handle these issues.
     
  • What happens if a child is not present on the day when vaccination is offered in the school?
    For any children absent on the vaccination day, there will be catch-up arrangements in place that the SAIS provider team will be able to share with the school. Alternatively they can book an appointment through the National Booking Service online or by calling 119 between 8am and 8pm, seven days a week. The three mass vaccination centres across Hampshire and the Isle of Wight are also now offering walk-in appointments to people aged 12-15 for their first or second COVID-19 vaccinations. You can also call the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Helpline on 0300 561 0018 for more information on vaccinations and help finding your nearest site.
     
  • Why do children have to be observed for 15 minutes after vaccination?
    Serious allergic reactions to vaccination are very rare but tend to happen within a few minutes of the injection. SAIS teams are all trained to spot and manage allergic reactions and so all children will be observed for 15 minutes. All SAIS providers will bring the necessary equipment to treat an allergic reaction. Children with allergies to common food items are not at higher risk of these serious allergies.
     
  • Will children who are home educated be offered a vaccine as part of this programme?
    All children in the eligible age group who do not attend school, for example those who are home educated or living in secure accommodation should be offered the vaccine. The SAIS provider will have plans in place to offer vaccination to these children.
     
  • Can a 12 to 15 year old use the National Booking Service to make an appointment for a COVID-19 vaccination?
    Anyone aged 12 and over is able to book an appointment to get vaccinated. Any child aged 12-15 attending a vaccination site, pop-up, community pharmacy or GP site will need to attend with their parent or guardian, who will be asked to give their consent. Appointments for first or second vaccinations (if 12 weeks have passed) for 12 to 15 year olds can be made via the National Booking Service online or by calling 119 between 8am and 8pm, seven days a week.
     
  • Can a healthy 12 to 15 year old use a COVID-19 walk-in site?
    Yes - the three mass vaccination centres across Hampshire and the Isle of Wight are also now offering walk-in appointments to people aged 12-15 for their first or second COVID-19 vaccinations. Community based pop-ups are also available. You can also call the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Helpline on 0300 561 0018 for more information on vaccinations and help finding your nearest site. School-age immunisation service providers have also visited most schools across Hampshire and the Isle of Wight to offer vaccinations.

Information relating to vaccinations for children and young people aged between 12 and 17 can be found here, this includes links to the information in a range of different languages:COVID-19 vaccination: resources for children and young people aged 12 to 17 years - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

A checklist for parents can be found here: COVID-19 vaccination: checklist for parents of children aged 12 to 15 years - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Easy read guidance for parents or carers for this group can be found here: COVID-19 vaccination: easy-read resources for children and young people - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

 

Everyone aged 5 and over is eligible for a first and second dose of the coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine.

If you have not yet been vaccinated, you're still eligible and can book anytime. The COVID-19 vaccine will reduce the chance of you suffering from COVID-19 disease.

The Hampshire and Isle of Wight COVID-19 Vaccination Helpline can help you with finding your nearest clinics, getting information in other languages such as Polish, Arabic, Chinese, Bengali and more, as well as sharing the latest information on eligibility. 

You can contact the helpline on 0300 561 0018 from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday, and 9am to 1pm at weekends. 

Getting vaccinated against COVID-19 is strongly recommended in pregnancy as it is the best way to protect both women and babies. In the UK, all adults including pregnant women are advised to have the first two doses of the vaccine, as well as a booster three months after their second dose.

The vaccines cannot give you or your baby COVID-19.

If you have any questions, you can speak to your midwife or GP for advice.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists has a range of resources and information to help you understand the facts behind the vaccine. You can read more on their website.

You can also find information about breastfeeding and the COVID-19 vaccine here.

The following video from the Lowdown covers a range of information on the topic with guest speakers Dr Viki Male and Dr Fatima Husain. You can watch it below. 

 

The Hampshire and Isle of Wight COVID-19 Vaccination Helpline can help you with finding your nearest clinics, getting information in other languages such as Polish, Arabic, Chinese, Bengali and more, as well as sharing the latest information on eligibility. 

You can contact the helpline on 0300 561 0018 from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday, and 9am to 1pm at weekends. 

 

 

The Joint Committee on Vaccinations and Immunisation (JCVI)  issued guidance on 3 September 2021 recommending a third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine as part of the primary course of vaccination for people who are severely immunosuppressed (as defined within the JCVI guidance) due to treatment for conditions such as cancer or for those with long-term chronic conditions where their immunity is affected by medication.

People who have a severely weakened immune system as a result of treatment, may not have the same immune response to the vaccine, and therefore, the JCVI recommends that a third dose will help reduce the risk of getting seriously ill or dying from COVID-19, and from spreading COVID-19. 

A series of frequently asked questions can be found below:

  • Who is eligible for it?

JCVI guidance recommends that a third dose is offered to individuals aged 12 years and over with severe immunosuppression, including those who are being treated for conditions such as cancer or for those with long-term chronic conditions where their immunity is significantly affected by regular medication. Severe immunosuppression is defined within the advice section of the JCVI guidance.

Guidance for household contacts of those who are immunosuppressed has not changed. They are recommended to be vaccinated with their first and second doses, in line with current JCVI guidance. Details are available here.

  • Is there a list of conditions and treatments available which identifies people who are considered severely immunosuppressed?

The list has been published by the JCVI and is available here.

  • How will patients know if they are eligible?

Consultants and GPs have been asked to identify patients eligible. Patients will be contacted by their consultant / hospital doctor or GP team who will discuss the timing of the third dose, considering the current or planned immunosuppressive therapies the patient is undergoing. Patients will be given a clinical authorisation letter which they will need to take with them to receive their vaccination.

  • Can patients be vaccinated at a walk-in vaccination site?

clinical authorisation letter will be given to eligible patients and this will act as authorisation to a COVID vaccination site that the patient requires a third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Individuals can go to a centre which their clinician has highlighted or, if not specified, to any COVID vaccine centre offering walk-in vaccinations. Patients can find a walk-in COVID vaccine centre here.

  • Can patients self-identify as severely immunosuppressed?

If individuals think they are eligible for a third dose and have not been contacted yet, they are advised to speak to their GP or Consultant.

  • Is the third dose the same as the booster vaccine?

No. The third dose is not the booster vaccine. It is recommended that the third dose should be given at least eight weeks after the second dose and is part of the primary course of immunisation. A booster jab is also expected be offered 6 months after the third dose, but we are currently awaiting JCVI guidance on this.

  • Which vaccine will be offered as a third dose?

JCVI have advised a preference for mRNA vaccines (full dose Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) for the third dose, with the option of the AstraZeneca Vaxzevria vaccine for individuals who have received this vaccine previously where this would facilitate delivery. For those aged 12 to 17, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is preferred.

  • When will a third dose be offered? What interval will there be between second and third dose?

The JCVI recommends that the third dose should be offered at least eight weeks after the second dose.

Research shows that, as with the interval between the first and second dose, eight weeks has been observed as providing the individual with the most benefits in terms of an immune response. If, however, the patient’s GP or Consultant believes that an alternative interval should be offered, because of ongoing treatment or starting treatment which will suppress the individual’s immune system, then this timing may be altered. Intervals will be considered, considering the individual’s specific health circumstances and an assessment made by their clinician.

Where possible, JCVI recommends that the third primary dose should be delayed until two weeks after the period of immunosuppression, in addition to the time for clearance of the therapeutic agent.

  • Will a booster vaccine also be given?

If you have a weakened immune system and have had a third dose of the vaccine, you can get a booster dose from three months after your third dose. You can then also get another booster around six months after this fourth dose.

Your GP or hospital specialist will invite you for your booster dose when it's due. If you have a letter from your GP or hospital specialist inviting you for an additional dose, you can get your booster at a walk-in COVID-19 vaccination site. You'll need to bring your letter with you.

  • If a severely immunosuppressed individual has had a good immune response to the first two doses, will they still be offered a third dose?

Some people who are immunosuppressed may not generate a good immune response regardless of the number of vaccine doses administrated. However, data is not currently available to reliably identify who might, or might not, benefit from a third primary dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

The JCVI guidance highlights published studies describing the effect of a third dose of mRNA vaccine in persons who are immunosuppressed reporting increased immune responses in varying proportions. JCVI guidance recommends that a third dose will be offered to individuals aged 12 years and over with severe immunosuppression (as defined within the JCVI guidance). 

Below are answers to a series of frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 booster programme.

 

  • Who is eligible for a booster jab?
    A booster dose of the coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine is available for everyone aged 16 and over, and some children aged 12 to 15, who have had two doses of the vaccine at least three months ago. People aged 16 years and over, and those aged 12 years and over who are at risk (including health and social care workers) will be offered a booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine. You can book online, or call 119 to make an appointment to have your booster. Further information on the booster vaccination is available on NHS.UK.

    Across Hampshire and Isle of Wight, COVID-19 booster doses are available at GP-led sites, large vaccination centres and numerous pop-up walk-in sites. You can book online, or call 119 to make an appointment to have your booster. 

    Those most vulnerable to COVID-19 including those aged 75+, older adult care home residents and those with weakened immune systems (12+) were invited for a second COVID-19 booster vaccine to maintain their protection, as part of a spring campaign. This came to an end on 30 June 2022.

    You can call the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Helpline on 0300 561 0018 for more information on your nearest site or to check eligibility.
     
  • I am eligible for a booster jab – why haven’t I been invited yet?
    Anyone over the age of 16 is eligible for the booster and as such you don't need to wait for an invitation. People aged 75+, older adult care home residents and those with weakened immune systems (12+) were invited for a second COVID-19 booster vaccine to maintain their protection, as part of a spring campaign. They will have received an invitation for this additional booster jab and it needed to be given by 30 June 2022.
     
  • I am severely immunosuppressed. When will I get my booster?
    The JCVI has advised that individual who are severely immunosuppressed get an additional third dose of vaccine as part of their primary course of immunisation. This offer is separate to the booster programme. More information is available here: COVID-19: guidance for people whose immune system means they are at higher risk - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)
     
  • Is there anyone that shouldn’t have the booster vaccine?
    There are very few people in the eligible groups who should not have a booster. If you have had a severe reaction to a previous dose of the vaccine you should discuss this with your doctor.
     
  • Which COVID-19 vaccine will I receive for my booster jab?
    The JCVI advises a preference for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for the booster programme, regardless of which vaccine brand someone received for their primary doses. This follows data from the COV-BOOST trial that indicates the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is well tolerated as a third dose and provides a strong booster response. Alternatively, a half dose of the Moderna vaccine may be offered. Where mRNA vaccines cannot be offered, for example due to allergies, the AstraZeneca vaccine may be considered for those who received it previously. More detail is available in the green book.

    As with your previous dose the common side effects are the same for all COVID-19 vaccines used in the UK, and include:
    • having a painful, heavy feeling and tenderness in the arm where you had your injection. This tends to be worst around 1 to 2 days after the vaccine
    • feeling tired
    • headache
    • general aches, or mild flu like symptoms
       
  • Can you still catch COVID-19 after having the vaccine?
    The COVID-19 vaccination will reduce the chance of you suffering from COVID-19 disease. It may take a few days for your body to build up some protection from the booster.
     
  • I haven’t yet had the COVID-19 vaccination, can I still get my first jabs?
    Everyone that is eligible that hasn’t already had their first or second COVID-19 vaccination will still be able to get vaccinated. Everyone aged 16 and over can book their initial COVID-19 vaccination through the NHS booking service, call 119 free of charge (between 8am and 8pm), attend their nearest walk-in centre or call the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Helpline on 0300 561 0018 for more information.
     
  • Can I get the booster if I am pregnant?
    If you are pregnant you are eligible to receive a booster, no earlier than six months after completion of the first course of vaccination.

 

Please note: The Hampshire and Isle of Wight COVID-19 Vaccination Helpline can help you with finding your nearest clinics, getting information in other languages such as Polish, Arabic, Chinese, Bengali and more, as well as sharing the latest information on eligibility. 

You can contact the helpline on 0300 561 0018 from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday, and 9am to 1pm at weekends. 

Information relating to booster doses for eligible ages (anyone aged 16+) can be found here, this includes links to the information in different languages: COVID-19 vaccination: booster dose resources - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

 

Resources for schools can be found below:

COVID-19 vaccination programme for children and young people: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-vaccination-resources-for-schools

 

The Hampshire and Isle of Wight COVID-19 Vaccination Helpline can help you with finding your nearest clinics, getting information in other languages such as Polish, Arabic, Chinese, Bengali and more, as well as sharing the latest information on eligibility. 

You can contact the helpline on 0300 561 0018 from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday, and 9am to 1pm at weekends. 

 

Support the COVID-19 vaccination programme 

Are you interested in volunteering to support the COVID-19 vaccination programme? There are both paid and unpaid roles available. 

You can find out more about opportunities locally here.

Alternatively visit the NHS England and NHS Improvement opportunities page here.

 

COVID-19 vaccination scam alert

We are aware that some people have received fraudulent calls and text messages offering them a COVID-19 vaccination. In some cases, people are asked to press a number on their keypad or to send a text message to confirm that they wish to receive the vaccine.

Doing so is likely to result in a charge being applied to their phone bill. In other cases, callers are offering the vaccine for a fee or asking for bank details. People are warned to be alert to these scams.

The NHS will:

  • NEVER ask you to press a button on your keypad or send a text asking you to confirm you want the vaccine.
  • NEVER ask for payment for the vaccine or for your bank details.

If you receive a call you believe to be fraudulent, hang up. If you believe you have been the victim of fraud or identity theft you should report this directly to Action Fraud at www.actionfraud.police.uk on 0300 123 2040.

Where the victim is vulnerable, report it to Hampshire Constabulary online at www.hampshire.police.uk or by calling 101.

 

Where can I get more information on getting vaccinated?

The Hampshire and Isle of Wight COVID-19 Vaccination Helpline can help you with finding your nearest clinics, getting information in other languages such as Polish, Arabic, Chinese, Bengali and more, as well as sharing the latest information on eligibility. 

You can contact the helpline on 0300 561 0018 from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday, and 9am to 1pm at weekends. 

Get the latest updates and advice on the vaccine programme from:

You might also be interested in...